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The Joy of the Storyboard

Over my years of working in film and television, both in front of and behind the camera, I really came to learn the value of the storyboard.
When performing, it was an appreciated short cut through lots of words that enabled actor, director, cinematographer, art department…indeed the whole team to know what it was we were all aiming for.

Later on when I had moved into directing, despite struggling with the process of drafting my own storyboards (I’m not even slightly gifted in the drawing department) I was able to make myself sufficiently visually understood to achieve what was necessary.



I continued to use the storyboard as a tool even when I was working in fields that did not traditionally utilise the method - for example conference presentations, corporate training, facilitation of meetings, workshops of any kind. What I love is that it provides an impersonal touchstone, a place to go to settle any argument, a provider of clarity and something to point at!

Recently, I came across this article about using storyboarding to improve the efficiency of meetings on LinkedIn, and it got me thinking:

http://www.techrepublic.com/google-amp/article/how...

Despite so many years of my working life spent in projects that revolved around a storyboard, I had never thought to transfer it’s wisdom to the classroom, or indeed to any project (outside film) that involved children or young people.

What a fool! I see now that it could be a powerful tool in any situation communicating with youngsters, especially some of those sensitive souls who find it intimidating to constantly have to depend on the spoken or written word, or those whose verbal capabilities are limited.

I haven’t tried it out yet, but I fully intend to, I think it could be particularly useful when dealing with fractious behavioural issues…let’s map out what just happened, what happens if we draw a different story of what could have occurred from this point here…. and so on.

If any of you try this, I’d love to here your stories - whether positive or negative, it’s all learning.

Thank you.