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Time Travel

Nikky

It can be difficult for us grown-ups to understand how differently time is perceived by a toddler, a child, or even a teenager.

More often than not, our adult lives are just a hectic rush between one responsibility and another - and it seems that it all gets faster and faster as the years go by. Anyone who has tried to get a young child ready for anything will understand the frustration. How come they don’t have any sense of urgency? Why can’t they see that we’re in a hurry and act accordingly?

On the other hand, we come into contact with all sorts of advice telling us that our lives and our mental health would improve if we took time to savour each moment, rather than constantly living in the future or the past. And guess what - our children are much more likely to be living in the moment than we are. It just might be a differently experienced moment.

We are increasingly agitated at even the smallest delay in our lives, whether instigated by our children or by an outside influence, impatience is a growing problem, but the most effective way to mitigate it might be by paying more attention to our children.

Everyone has a different pace. We all know people who hurtle around at breakneck speed, irritating us with their ability to get more done that we can manage in the same amount of time. Or there are those who need more time to deal with any task or question, and who drive mad those of us who put stock in getting things done quickly and efficiently.

The truth, of course, is that we all move to the beat of a different drummer. Young children are likely to need a slow and regular 4/4.

They need time, there’s a lot of work going on in those brains and they’re not yet able - nor should they be - to fire at the same pace of those of us who’ve been practising for decades. So take a deep breath, let them take the time the need - it may even teach you something to slow down and give yourself some time to absorb and process new information.

Let things take the time they take.

You Hum It, I'll Play It!

Nikky

My recent visit to Estonia included a weekend off, and during that time, I did some Yoga and Pilates classes. I don’t speak the language, but I nevertheless found it relatively easy to follow instructions. I think this reflects some important points about basic levels of communication.

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Interview With SEN Resources

Nikky

I'm working away from home at the moment with very little time for blog-writing, so this week I'm posting my interview with SEN Resources - and here's a link to their page: https://senresourcesblog.com . Hope you enjoy it.

INTERVIEW WITH NIKKY SMEDLEY ON PLAYING LAALAA IN TELETUBBIES TO WRITING HER NEW BOOK ‘CREATE, PERFORM, TEACH!’
I was a bit star struck this week, Nikky Smedley who played the Teletubby Laalaa (my favourite childhood TV character) kindly agreed to answer some questions I had about her new book. When I found out that she had written ‘Create, Perform, Teach!‘ I was intrigued as to how she moved from children TV to the education sector.

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What a Performance!

Nikky

I've been holding drama workshops in Latvia again - so I'm re-publishing this blog, for the participants of those workshops:

This article, discussing the value of incorporating performance into senior school, first appeared in Teach Secondary magazine.

My thanks to editor Helen Mulley for allowing reproduction, and if you want to know more, details of this and their other magazines and resources are available at:https://www.teachwire.net

What a Performance!

It’s a curious dichotomy we live with when it comes to the notion of performance, I think. On the one hand it feels like every other young person you come across is all set to win the X Factor and become the next big thing, and on the other hand we’re brought up being told that no-one really likes a show off. . . talk about mixed messages. . . where does this leave us with our attitude to performing within our school environment?

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Best Days of your Life?

Nikky

So it's time to start thinking about the school year that lies ahead for our little darlings. How well do you remember your own school days? What are the things you remember most powerfully? Do you feel in touch with your own childhood? Does the remembering make you feel good or bad?

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